7h atomic orbitals

There are eleven 7h orbitals. These are labelled 7hz5, 7hyz4, 7hxz4, 7hz3xy, 7hz3(x2y2), 7hz2y3, 7hz2x3, 7hz(4x3y–4xy3), 7hz(x4–6x2y2+y4), 7hyx4, and 7hxy4.

The shape of the 7h orbitals. Orbital names are shown beneath the images. For each, the turquoise (cyan) zones are where the values of the 7h wave functions are positive while the white zones denote negative values.

The 7hz5 orbital (top row in the image above) is an abbreviation for 5hz(63z4 - 70z2r2 + 15r4).

The 7hyz4 orbital (left orbital in next to top row in the above image) is an abbreviation for 7hy(21z4–14z2r2+r4). The 7hxz4 orbital (right orbital in next to top row in the above image) is an abbreviation for 7hx(21z4–14z2r2+r4). These two orbitals are related to each other by a 90° rotation about the z-axis.

The 7hz3xy orbital (left orbital in third row from the top in the above image) is an abbreviation for 7h(2xy)(3z3zr2). The 7hz3(x2y2) orbital (right orbital in third row from the top in the above image) is an abbreviation for 7h(x2y3)(3z3zr2). These two orbitals are related to each other by a 45° rotation about the z-axis.

The 7hz2y3 (left orbital in fourth row from the top in the above image) is an abbreviation for 7hy(3x2y2)(9z2r2). The 7hz2x3 orbital (right orbital in fourth row from the top in the above image) is an abbreviation for 7hx(x2–3y2)(9z2r2). These two orbitals are related to each other by a 30° rotation about the z-axis.

The 7hz(4x3y–4xy3) orbital is the left orbital in fifth row from the top in the above image). The 7hz(x4–6x2y2+y4) orbital is the right orbital in fifth row from the top in the above image. These two orbitals are related to each other by a 22.5° rotation about the z-axis.

The 7hyx4 (left orbital in bottom row in the above image) is an abbreviation for 7hy(5x4–10y2x2+y4) and 7hxy4 (right orbital in bottom row in the above image) is an abbreviation for 7hx(x4–10y2x2+5y4). They are related to each other by a 18° rotation about the z-axis.

The 7h orbitals each have one spherical nodes but the higher h orbitals (8h, 9h, ...) are more complex since they have additional spherical nodes while lower orbitals (7h have none.


The OrbitronTM, a gallery of orbitals on the WWW: https://winter.group.shef.ac.uk/orbitron/
Copyright 2002-2021 Prof Mark J. Winter [Department of Chemistry, The University of Sheffield]. All rights reserved.