7g atomic orbitals

For any atom, there are nine 7g orbitals. Higher g-orbitals (8g, 9g, ...) are more complex since they have more spherical nodes while lower g-orbitals (5g and 6g) have fewer.

The shapes of the nine 7g orbitals. From left to right: (top row) 7gz4, (next to top row) 7gz3x and 7gz3y, (middle row) 7gz2xy and 7gz2(x2 - y2), (next to bottom row) 7gzx3 and 7gzy3, (bottom row) 7gxy(x2-y2) and 7gx4 + y4. For each, the purple zones are where the wave functions have positive values and the white zones denote negative values.

The 7gxy(x2-y2) and 7gx4 + y4 (bottom row in the image above) are related to each other by a 22.5° rotation about the z-axis.

The 7gzx3 [an abbreviation for 7gxz(x2 - 3y2)] and 7gzy3 [an abbreviation for 7gyz(3x2 - y2)] orbitals (next to bottom row in the image above) are related to each other by a 30° rotation about the z-axis.

The 7gz2xy [an abbreviation for 7gxy(6z2 - x2 - y2)] and 7gz2(x2 - y2) [an abbreviation for 7g(x2 - y2)(6z2 - x2 - y2)] orbitals (middle row in the image above) are related to each other by a 45° rotation about the z-axis.

The 7gz3x and 7gz3y (next to top row in the image above) are related to each other by a 90° rotation about the z-axis.


The OrbitronTM, a gallery of orbitals on the WWW: https://winter.group.shef.ac.uk/orbitron/
Copyright 2002-2021 Prof Mark J. Winter [Department of Chemistry, The University of Sheffield]. All rights reserved.